The guide dog or assistance dog is a being that is doing a noble job: to facilitate independent mobility to any person who needs help. It is trained to avoid obstacles and look for what the user indicates, achieving being not only a tool for a better displacement, but a faithful companion, attentive to give an answer and affection to those who have the fortune of knowing it.

In the photo, the assistance dog, Nala, is caressed by Felipe, the first Latin American child to have the help of a Lazarillo dog.

In the photo, the assistance dog, Nala, is caressed by Felipe, the first Latin American child to have the help of a Lazarillo dog.

We have seen them in the street, vivacious, guiding people with some type of disability. Usually, Labrador Retriever or Golden Retriever. Beautiful dogs of which little we know. Only that they fulfill the noble mission of helping people who need it, either to avoid obstacles in the way of blind people with low vision or to achieve things for everyone with reduced mobility. But how are the guide dogs?

The guide dogs move with security and intelligence. A height of about 55 cm. Approximately, high degree of brain vivacity and being sociable towards humans and animals, are some of the characteristics that a guide dog must meet, according to the Dog Training School Guide of Mexico (www.perrosguia.org.mx). Also, the school highlights that the Labrador Retriever or Golden Retriever dogs showed to have exceptional characteristics to be guide dogs: "Of docile character, easily trainable, without shyness or cowardice, they demonstrate security before strange and unpredictable circumstances and sufficient mental agility as to be located in the precise moment. Because of their great sensitivity they must be treated with affection since they value very especially all the demonstrations of affection of their master ".